(Anti)Cheats

Cheating in video games involves a video game player using non-standard methods for creating an advantage beyond normal gameplay, usually to make the game easier. Cheats may be activated from within the game itself (a cheat code implemented by the original game developers); or created by third-party software (a game trainer) or hardware (a cheat cartridge). They can also be realised by exploiting software bugs, but if it is really cheating is also matter of common knowledge. Software bugs are very often considered software features and as long as they are common knowledge, it is questionable whether it is cheating. [Wikipedia]

Cheating in online games is an activity that modifies the game experience to give one player an advantage over others. Depending on the game, different activities constitute cheating and it is either a matter of game policy or consensus opinion as to whether a particular activity is considered to be cheating. Johan Huizinga defines cheating as the action of pretending to obey the rules of the game, while secretly subverting them to gain advantage over an opponent.
Cheating reportedly exists in most multiplayer online games, but it is difficult to measure. The Internet and darknets can provide players with the methodology necessary to cheat in online games, sometimes in return for a price. [Wikipedia]

Types of Cheats/Hacks (Most used/Known):

Aimbot / Triggerbot:
An aimbot (sometimes called “auto-aim”) is a type of computer game bot used in multiplayer first-person shooter games to provide varying levels of target acquisition assistance to the player. While most common in first person shooter games, they exist in other game types and are sometimes used colloquially with a TriggerBot, which shoots automatically when an opponent appears within the field-of-view or aiming reticule of the player.

Wallhack:
Example:
Wallhack

Speedhack:
(Video Coming soon)

ESP:
esp

Unlimited Ammo Hack:

Other Stuff (Not necessary called “cheats/ hacks”):

1.Bhop
2.>Ghosting

Anti-Cheats:

1. Valve Anti-Cheat:
Valve Anti-Cheat, abbreviated as VAC, is an anti-cheat software developed by Valve Corporation as a component of the Steam platform, first released with Counter-Strike in 2002. During one week of November 2006, the system detected over 10,000 cheating attempts.[1] As of July 2014, it is estimated that over 2.2 million Steam accounts have been banned by the system,[2][3] and is used in several games on Steam.
When the software detects a cheat on a player’s system, it will ban them in the future, possibly days or weeks after the original detection.[4] It may kick players from the game if it detects errors in their system’s memory or hardware. No information such as date of detection or type of cheat detected is disclosed to the player. After the player is notified, access to online “VAC protected” servers of the game the player cheated in is permanently revoked and additional restrictions are applied to the player’s Steam account.

2. Punkbuster:
PunkBuster is a computer program that is designed to detect software used for cheating in online games. It does this by scanning the memory contents of the local machine. A computer identified as using cheats may be banned from connecting to protected servers. The aim of the program is to isolate cheaters and prevent them from disrupting legitimate games. PunkBuster is developed and published by Even Balance, Inc.

3. FairFight:
FairFight® is a non-invasive, customizable, Server Side Anti-Cheat engine using agnostic technology that operates in real time. It does not reside on the player’s computer or the game server, and does not examine the players’ devices or perpetually look for the latest hacks.

(More updates coming soon)